G.I. STRIPS

Hot dip galvanised strip products (G.I. STRIPS)

  • Hot dip galvanising is primarily an industrial protective coating process designed to provide a tough and durable protective coating for steel that will generally outlast the design life of the structure to which it is applied.
  • G.I. Strips are the items coated with a thin layer of zinc for corrosion resistance. Usually Galvanised Strips shaped into straight parallel ridges and hollows.
  • Galvanised strips are widely used in applications where rust resistance is needed.
  • Galvanised strips can be welded; however, one must exercise caution around the resulting zinc fumes.

Raw material

Mild Steel as per IS 2062

Sizes

  • 25 x 3 / 4 / 5 / 6mm
  • 30 x 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 8mm
  • 32 x 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 8 / 10mm
  • 37 x 9mm
  • 40 x 5 / 6 / 8 / 10 / 12 / 16 / 20 / 25mm
  • 421/2 x 14 / 15 / 16mm
  • 44 x 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12mm
  • 48 x 9 / 10 / 11 / 12mm
  • 50 x 5 / 6 / 8 / 10 /11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 16 / 20 / 25 /32mm
  • 65 x 6 / 8 / 10 / 12 / 16 / 20 / 25 /32mm
  • 75 x 6 / 8 / 10 / 12 / 16 / 20 / 25 /32mm
  • 100 x 6 / 8 / 10 / 12 / 16 / 20 / 25 /32mm
  • 120 x 6 / 8mm
  • 125 x 6 / 8 / 10 / 12 / 16 / 20 / 25mm
  • 130 x 12mm
  • 150 x 6 / 8 / 10 / 12 / 16 / 20mm

Finish

Hot dip Galvanised as per I.S. 2629 / 2633 / 4759.

The process of hot-dip Galvanising results in a metallurgical bond between zinc and steel with a series of distinct iron-zinc alloys. The resulting coated steel can be used in much the same way as uncoated.

A typical hot-dip Galvanising line operates as follows

Steel is cleaned using a caustic solution. This removes oil/grease, dirt, and paint.
The caustic cleaning solution is rinsed off.
The steel is pickled in an acidic solution to remove mill scale.
The pickling solution is rinsed off.
A flux, often zinc ammonium chloride is applied to the steel to inhibit oxidation of the cleaned surface upon exposure to air.
The flux is allowed to dry on the steel and aids in the process of the liquid zinc wetting and adhering to the steel.
The steel is dipped into the molten zinc bath and held there until the temperature of the steel equilibrates with that of the bath.
The steel is cooled in a quench tank to reduce its temperature and inhibit undesirable reactions of the newly-formed coating with the atmosphere.